Website in transition!

On November 1, 2014, the Public Service Labour Relations and Employment Board (PSLREB) was created. The PSLREB was created when the Public Service Labour Relations Board (PSLRB) and the Public Service Staffing Tribunal (PSST) merged. This PSLRB website is in the process of being phased out in favour of the new PSLREB website. During a period of transition, this PSLRB website will continue to provide archived reports, decisions, and transitional information. Please visit the new PSLREB website for the most recent content.

Frequently Asked Questions About the Legislation

What statutes does the Public Service Labour Relations Board administer?

The key statute administered by the PSLRB is the Public Service Labour Relations Act (PSLRA) covering the federal public service, which includes the departments named in Schedule I of the Financial Administration Act, the other portions of the federal public administration named in Schedule IV and the separate agencies named in Schedule V.

In addition to the PSLRA, the PSLRB administers the Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act, which covers employees of the Parliament of Canada.

Under the Budget Implementation Act, 2009, the PSLRB is also responsible for dealing with some pay equity complaints filed with the Canadian Human Rights Commission. Once the Public Sector Equitable Compensation Act has been proclaimed in force, the PSLRB will become responsible for dealing with all pay equity complaints relating to the federal public service.

The PSLRB also administers certain provisions of Part II of the Canada Labour Code, which gives employees recourse against reprisals for exercising their rights under the Code.

As well, the PSLRB administers the collective bargaining and grievance adjudication systems under the Yukon Education Labour Relations Act and the Yukon Public Service Labour Relations Act. When performing these functions, which are funded by the Yukon government, the PSLRB acts respectively as the Yukon Teachers Labour Relations Board and the Yukon Public Service Labour Relations Board.

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When did the Public Service Labour Relations Act (PSLRA) come into effect?

The PSLRA, which was established by the Public Service Modernization Act, came into effect on April 1, 2005, as did the Public Service Labour Relations Board Regulations (the Regulations) accompanying the PSLRA. It replaced the Public Service Staff Relations Act (PSSRA).

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What key changes to labour relations were introduced by the PSLRA?

The PSLRA is one part of a larger package of reforms in federal public service human resource management. The following is an overview of the key changes introduced by the PSLRA.

  • The PSLRA establishes a more comprehensive unfair labour practices regime and creates more comprehensive grievance and adjudication mechanisms.
  • Each department and agency must establish a labour-management consultation committee in cooperation with the bargaining agents.
  • The PSLRA provides for the co-development of workplace improvements, a process through which representatives of both the employer and employees work together to resolve workplace issues.
  • Each department and agency must establish an informal conflict management system in cooperation with the bargaining agents.
  • The parties must negotiate and conclude essential services agreements to protect the safety and security of the public during a strike.
  • When hearing grievances, adjudicators are empowered to consider aspects of the grievance that relate to discrimination within the meaning of the Canadian Human Rights Act, which was not possible under the PSSRA.
  • The interpretation or application of a collective agreement may be the focus of a policy grievance presented by the employer or the bargaining agent, or a group grievance presented by the bargaining agent.
  • The PSLRA requires a secret ballot within 60 days before a strike.
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What happened to cases that were filed under the Public Service Staff Relations Act (PSSRA) and were still open on April 1, 2005?

The PSLRB continues to process all files that remained open at the Public Service Staff Relations Board (PSSRB) — there is no need to re-file.  

Labour relations matters that were filed with the PSSRB, such as certification applications and determinations of managerial or confidential employees, are dealt with in accordance with the legislative provisions set out in the PSLRA, and the rules of procedure set out in the Regulations must be followed. However, where a notice to bargain was given prior to the coming into force of the PSLRA, and the bargaining agent had selected conciliation/strike as its dispute resolution method, the “designation” process of the PSSRA continues to apply until a new collective agreement is entered into.

Complaints that were filed with the PSSRB are also dealt with in accordance with the PSLRA, with the following exceptions:

  • complaints that were filed under paragraph 23(1)(b) of the PSSRA respecting the failure of a party to give effect to an arbitral award will be deemed to be “policy grievances” and will be processed accordingly;
  • complaints that were filed under paragraph 23(1)(c) of the PSSRA respecting the failure to give effect to an adjudicator’s decision will be deemed withdrawn, in light of the enforcement provisions under the PSLRA.

Grievances that were presented under the PSSRA but not finally dealt with before the coming into force of the PSLRA continue to be dealt with in accordance with the provisions of the PSSRA. Such grievances will also be subject to the P.S.S.R.B. Regulations and Rules of Procedure, 1993.

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How did the PSLRA change the collective bargaining process?

  1. The Public Service Labour Relations Act established a new conciliation process. Public Interest Commissions replace conciliation boards and conciliation commissioners (ss. 162-167). Public Interest Commissions are non-permanent bodies consisting of one or three persons, appointed by the Minister responsible, whose role is to assist the parties to resolve disputes and to make recommendations for settlement. The Chairperson of the PSLRB recommends the appointment of a Public Interest Commission either at the request of the parties or on his or her own initiative.
  2. The PSLRA has enabled two-tier bargaining. Two-tier bargaining allows for service-wide bargaining to set the broad parameters for terms and conditions of employment in a bargaining unit while permitting precise details to be negotiated in departments, if the employer, bargaining agent and deputy head jointly agree (s. 110).
  3. In order to declare a strike, the PSLRA requires bargaining agents to hold a strike vote by secret ballot. All employees in the bargaining unit have the right to participate in the vote and must be given reasonable access to the vote (s. 184). Strike votes have to be held within the 60 days preceding any strike. A majority of those voting will have to be in favour in order for a strike to be declared (s. 196(s)).The PSLRB may hear complaints of alleged irregularities with respect to the conduct of the vote (s. 184(2)) where an application is made within 10 days of the announcement of results.

Please see the fact sheet on collective bargaining for more information.