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On November 1, 2014, the Public Service Labour Relations and Employment Board (PSLREB) was created. The PSLREB was created when the Public Service Labour Relations Board (PSLRB) and the Public Service Staffing Tribunal (PSST) merged. This PSLRB website is in the process of being phased out in favour of the new PSLREB website. During a period of transition, this PSLRB website will continue to provide archived reports, decisions, and transitional information. Please visit the new PSLREB website for the most recent content.

PSLRB Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) - 2014–15





Public Service Labour Relations Board


2014–15

Report on Plans and Priorities







The Honourable Shelly Glover, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages



2014–15
ESTIMATES

PART III Departmental Expenditure Plans: Reports on Plans and Priorities

Purpose

Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP) are individual expenditure plans for each department and agency. These reports provide increased levels of detail over a three-year period on an organization's main priorities by strategic outcome, program and planned/expected results, including links to related resource requirements presented in the Main Estimates. In conjunction with the Main Estimates, Reports on Plans and Priorities serve to inform members of Parliament on planned expenditures of departments and agencies, and support Parliament's consideration of supply bills. The RPPs are typically tabled soon after the Main Estimates by the President of the Treasury Board.

Estimates Documents

The Estimates comprise three parts:

Part I - Government Expenditure Plan provides an overview of the Government's requirements and changes in estimated expenditures from previous fiscal years.

Part II - Main Estimates supports the appropriation acts with detailed information on the estimated spending and authorities being sought by each federal organization requesting appropriations.

In accordance with Standing Orders of the House of Commons, Parts I and II must be tabled on or before March 1.

Part III - Departmental Expenditure Plans consists of two components:

  • Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP)
  • Departmental Performance Report (DPR)

DPRs are individual department and agency accounts of results achieved against planned performance expectations as set out in respective RPPs.

The DPRs for the most recently completed fiscal year are tabled in the fall by the President of the Treasury Board.

Supplementary Estimates support Appropriation Acts presented later in the fiscal year. Supplementary Estimates present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or have subsequently been refined to account for developments in particular programs and services. Supplementary Estimates also provide information on changes to expenditure forecasts of major statutory items as well as on such items as: transfers of funds between votes; debt deletion; loan guarantees; and new or increased grants.

For more information on the Estimates, please consult the Treasury Board Secretariat website.i

Links to the Estimates

As shown above, RPPs make up part of the Part III of the Estimates documents. Whereas Part II emphasizes the financial aspect of the Estimates, Part III focuses on financial and non-financial performance information, both from a planning and priorities standpoint (RPP), and an achievements and results perspective (DPR).

The Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS) establishes a structure for display of financial information in the Estimates and reporting to Parliament via RPPs and DPRs. When displaying planned spending, RPPs rely on the Estimates as a basic source of financial information.

Main Estimates expenditure figures are based on the Annual Reference Level Update, which is prepared in the fall. In comparison, planned spending found in RPPs includes the Estimates, as well as any other amounts that have been approved through a Treasury Board submission up to February 1 (see Definitions section). This readjusting of the financial figures allows for a more up-to-date portrait of planned spending by program.

Changes to the presentation of the Report on Plans and Priorities

Several changes have been made to the presentation of the RPP partially to respond to a number of requests from the House of Commons Standing Committees on Public Accounts (PAC - Report 15ii), in 2010; and on Government and Operations Estimates (OGGO - Report 7iii), in 2012 to provide more detailed financial and non-financial performance information about programs within RPPs and DPRs, thus improving the ease of their study to support appropriations approval.

  • In Section II, financial, human resources and performance information is now presented at the Program and Sub-program levels for more granularity.
  • The report's general format and terminology have been reviewed for clarity and consistency purposes.
  • Other efforts aimed at making the report more intuitive and focused on Estimates information were made to strengthen alignment with the Main Estimates.

How to read this document

RPPs are divided into four sections:

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

This Organizational Expenditure Overview allows the reader to get a general glance at the organization. It provides a description of the organization's purpose, as well as basic financial and human resources information. This section opens with the new Organizational Profile, which displays general information about the department, including the names of the minister and the deputy head, the ministerial portfolio, the year the department was established, and the main legislative authorities. This subsection is followed by a new subsection entitled Organizational Context, which includes the Raison d'être, the Responsibilities, the Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture, the Organizational Priorities and the Risk Analysis. This section ends with the Planned Expenditures, the Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes, the Estimates by Votes and the Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. It should be noted that this section does not display any non-financial performance information related to programs (please see Section II).

Section II: Analysis of Program by Strategic Outcome

This Section provides detailed financial and non-financial performance information for strategic outcomes, programs and sub-programs. This section allows the reader to learn more about programs by reading their respective description and narrative entitled "Planning Highlights". This narrative speaks to key services or initiatives, which support the plans and priorities presented in Section I; it also describes how performance information supports the department's strategic outcome or parent program.

Section III: Supplementary Information

This section provides supporting information related to departmental plans and priorities. In this section, the reader will find the future-oriented statement of operations and a link to supplementary information tables regarding transfer payments, as well as information related to the greening government operations, internal audits and evaluations, horizontal initiatives, user fees, major crown and transformational projects, and up-front multi-year funding, where applicable to individual organizations. The reader will also find a link to the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report, produced annually by the Minister of Finance, which provides estimates and projections of the revenue impacts of federal tax measures designed to support the economic and social priorities of the Government of Canada.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

In this last section, the reader will have access to organizational contact information.

Definitions

Appropriation

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Budgetary Vs. Non-budgetary Expenditures

Budgetary expenditures operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to crown corporations.

Non-budgetary expenditures net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

Expected Result

An outcome that a program is designed to achieve.

Full-Time Equivalent (FTE)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. FTEs are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada Outcomes

A set of high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole.

Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS)

A common approach and structure to the collection, management and reporting of financial and non-financial performance information.

An MRRS provides detailed information on all departmental programs (e.g., program costs, program expected results and their associated targets, how they align to the government's priorities and intended outcomes, etc.) and establishes the same structure for both internal decision making and external accountability.

Planned Spending

For the purpose of the RPP, planned spending refers to those amounts for which a Treasury Board (TB) submission approval has been received by no later than February 1, 2014. This cut-off date differs from the Main Estimates process. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditure levels presented in the 2014–15 Main Estimates.

Program

A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture

A structured inventory of a department's programs, where programs are arranged in a hierarchical manner to depict the logical relationship between each program and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Spending Areas

Government of Canada categories of expenditures. There are four spending areasiv (social affairs, economic affairs, international affairs and government affairs), each comprising three to five Government of Canada outcomes.

Strategic Outcome

A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the department's mandate, vision, and core functions.

Sunset Program

A time-limited program that does not have on-going funding or policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made as to whether to continue the program. (In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level, and duration).

Whole-of-Government Framework

A map of the financial and non-financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations that aligns their programs to a set of high-level outcome areas defined for the government as a whole.


ISSN 2292-339X

Table of Contents

Chairperson's Message

David Paul Olsen, Acting Chairperson

I am pleased to present the Public Service Labour Relations Board's (PSLRB) Report on Plans and Priorities for 2014–15.

In December 2013, the Budget Implementation Act received royal assent. Included in that Act are provisions to merge the PSLRB and the Public Service Staffing Tribunal into an organization to be called the Public Service Labour Relations and Employment Board (PSLREB).

The new Board will deal with matters that were previously dealt with by those former Boards under the Public Service Labour Relations Act and the Public Service Employment Act, respectively, which will permit proceedings under those Acts to be consolidated. Provisions to create the new Board will come into force on a date that has yet to be determined by Order in Council.

Until that time, the two organizations will continue to operate independently while working jointly and with other stakeholders to create the new PSLREB.

For the duration of the transition period, the PSLRB will focus its efforts on maintaining service delivery to its clients while preparing for the creation of the new PSLREB. This will involve streamlining its adjudication processes in consultation with the parties, improving its case analysis capacity, and continuing to implement more efficient processes to resolve cases. The PSLRB will also review its mediation processes and discuss options with the parties to promote case mediation as an efficient and effective dispute resolution mechanism. The PSLRB has implemented the changes to the collective bargaining regime, which came into force upon royal assent of the Act. Finally, the PSLRB is conducting an analysis of the implications of the other legislative changes that have yet to come into force.

Through the hard work and dedication of my colleagues and employees, I am confident that the PSLRB will meet its responsibilities with the utmost efficiency.

David Paul Olsen

Acting Chairperson
Public Service Labour Relations Board


Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honourable Shelly Glover, P.C., M.P.

Deputy Head: David Paul Olsen, Acting Chairperson

Ministerial portfolio: The PSLRB is part of the Canadian Heritage portfolio.

Year established: April 1, 2005

Main legislative authorities: Public Service Labour Relations Act (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/P-33.3/), Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/P-1.3/), both of which can be found on the Justice Laws website.

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

The PSLRB is an independent quasi-judicial tribunal mandated by the Public Service Labour Relations Act (PSLRA) to administer the collective bargaining and grievance adjudication systems in the federal public service. It is also mandated by the Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act (PESRA) to perform the same role for the institutions of Parliament.

The PSLRB is unique in that it is one of the few bodies of its type in Canada that combine both adjudication functions and responsibilities as an impartial third party in the collective bargaining process. By resolving labour relations issues in an impartial manner, the PSLRB contributes to a productive and efficient workplace that ultimately benefits Canadians through the smooth delivery of government programs and services.

Responsibilities

The PSLRB came into being on April 1, 2005, with the enactment of the PSLRA, replacing the Public Service Staff Relations Board, which had existed since 1967, when collective bargaining was first introduced in the federal public service.

The PSLRB's three main services are as follows:

  • adjudication - hearing and deciding grievances, complaints, and other labour relations matters;
  • mediation - helping parties reach collective agreements, manage their relations under collective agreements, and resolve disputes without resorting to a hearing; and
  • compensation analysis and research - compiling, analyzing, and disseminating compensation information to compare the compensation of federal public servants with those in other levels of government and the private sector, and to support the collective bargaining and compensation determination processes in the federal public service.*

The Board is composed of the Chairperson, up to three Vice-Chairpersons, and full- and part-time Board members who are appointed by the Governor in Council for terms of no longer than five years and who may be reappointed.

Full- and part-time Board members are responsible for administering the PSLRA by conducting hearings across Canada and by rendering decisions at those hearings.

The PSLRB Executive Committee comprises the Chairperson, up to three Vice-Chairpersons, the Executive Director, the General Counsel, and five directors. The Committee provides strategic direction and oversight for the priorities and projects established in the PSLRB's annual strategic plan.

As per section 44 of the PSLRA, the Chairperson is the PSLRB's chief executive officer and has overall responsibility and accountability for managing the work of the PSLRB.

The Executive Director is responsible for leading and supervising the internal affairs of the PSLRB and the work of its employees. Reporting to the Chairperson, he is directly supported by five directors and three managers, who are responsible and accountable for establishing priorities, managing the work, and reporting on the performance of their specific units. The General Counsel also reports to the Chairperson and is responsible for providing legal advice and support to the Chairperson, the Board members, and the organization.

The PSLRA covers over 240,000 federal public service employees and applies to departments named in Schedule I to the Financial Administration Act, the other portions of the core public administration named in Schedule IV, and the separate agencies named in Schedule V.

The PSLRB is also responsible for administering the PESRA and acts as the labour board and grievance system administrator for all employees of Parliament (the House of Commons, the Senate, the Library of Parliament, the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, and the Office of the Senate Ethics Officer).

Under an agreement with the Yukon government, the PSLRB also administers the collective bargaining and grievance adjudication systems required by the Yukon Education Labour Relations Act and the Yukon Public Service Labour Relations Act. When performing those functions, the PSLRB acts as the Yukon Teachers Labour Relations Board and the Yukon Public Service Labour Relations Board, respectively.

As well, the mandate of the PSLRB has been further expanded as a result of transitional provisions under section 396 of the Budget Implementation Act, 2009. Specifically, the PSLRB is responsible for dealing with existing pay equity complaints for the public service that were, and could be, filed with the Canadian Human Rights Commission and those that may arise in future under the Public Sector Equitable Compensation Act.

*On December 12, 2013, the government's Budget Implementation Act received royal assent, which resulted in an amendment to the PSLRB mandate, namely, the immediate elimination of the compensation analysis and research function. The PSLRB will amend its Program Alignment Architecture in preparation for 2015–16, requesting that the change be retroactive to 2014–15.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

Strategic Outcome: The resolution of labour relations issues in the federal public service and in Parliament in an impartial manner

Program: Adjudication, mediation, and compensation analysis and research*

Internal Services

*As previously noted in this Report on Plans and Priorities, the PSLRB will amend its PAA in preparation for 2015–16 as a direct result of the Budget Implementation Act, which eliminated the PSLRB compensation analysis and research function. The PSLRB will request that the amendment to its PAA be retroactive to 2014–15.

Organizational Priorities


Organizational Priorities
Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Program
Continue to maintain service delivery
  • Improve the PSLRB's case analysis capacity and implement more efficient processes to resolve cases
  • Continue to review mediation processes to enhance efficiency and effectiveness
Ongoing The PSLRB has one strategic outcome: the resolution of labour relations issues in the federal public service and in Parliament in an impartial manner as mandated by the PSLRA and the PESRA, and one program with three distinct services: adjudication, mediation, and compensation analysis and research.
Description
Why is this a priority?

This will ultimately contribute to a productive, efficient workplace that is free from service disruptions and that ultimately delivers programs and services to Canadians that provide economic, social, and cultural benefits.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

The PSLRB will continue to streamline its current adjudication processes in consultation with the parties (e.g., bargaining agents and employers) and through its Client Consultation Committee. It will focus on continuing to use innovative ways to proactively manage its large caseload, including better managing the hearing process through front-end analytics (e.g., examining cases early in the process in an effort to prioritize and expedite matters) and case management tools. It also plans to hold more pre-hearing conferences and implement solutions to reduce last-minute hearing postponement requests, which are unproductive and costly for the federal public service and for the parties.

The PSLRB mediation services will review its processes and discuss options with the parties to promote the use of case mediation as an efficient and effective dispute resolution mechanism. This may involve grouping similar cases for mediation and preparing participants well in advance of meetings through pre-mediations.

Risk Analysis

Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
Inability to accelerate case resolution The PSLRB's case management abilities are somewhat influenced by factors beyond its control. For example, the parties' capacity to respond to the PSLRB's strategy to accelerate the resolution of cases may impact its success. Mitigation measures to reduce this risk will include continuing to consult with the parties, particularly through the Client Consultation Committee, pilot projects, and incremental implementation of all changes to support client buy-in and provide them with an opportunity to respond to the changes. Adjudication, mediation, and compensation analysis and research
Inability to fill part-time Board member vacancies The PSLRB Chairperson and Board officials will continue to work proactively with the Minister's office to ensure part-time positions are filled as quickly as possible. Board members address regional cases, which is cost-effective and which plays an important role in addressing the overall caseload. Adjudication, mediation, and compensation analysis and research

Planned Expenditures

The two tables below show information on the PSLRB's planned spending and planned full-time equivalents (FTEs) for the next three fiscal years.

Budgetary Financial Resources (Planned Spending dollars)

2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
13,745,412 13,745,412 13,745,412 13,745,412

Human Resources (Full-time equivalents FTEs)

2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
93 93 93

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome and Program (dollars)

Strategic Outcome, Program and Internal Services 2011–12
Expenditures
2012–13
Expenditures
2013–14
Forecast Spending
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
Strategic Outcome: The resolution of labour relations issues in the federal public service and in Parliament in an impartial manner
Adjudication, mediation, and compensation analysis and research 9,368,528 9,736,106 9,055,795 9,896,701 9,896,701 9,896,701 9,896,701
Internal Services
Subtotal
4,078,173 3,898,234 3,937,320 3,848,711 3,848,711 3,848,711 3,848,711
Total 13,446,701 13,634,340 12,993,115 13,745,412 13,745,412 13,745,412 13,745,412

In 2014–15, the PSLRB plans to spend $13.7 million to meet the expected results of its program activity and strategic outcome.

Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes

2014–15 Planned Spending by Whole-of-Government-Framework Spending Areav (dollars)

Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada
Outcome
2014–15 Planned
Spending
The resolution of labour relations issues in the federal public service and in Parliament in an impartial manner Adjudication, mediation, and compensation analysis and research Government Affairs Government of Canada's Well-managed and Efficient Government Operations Outcome Area 9,896,701

Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)

Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs  
Social Affairs  
International Affairs  
Government Affairs 13,745,412

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

[text version]

The figure above illustrates the PSLRB's spending trend from 2011–12 to 2016–17.

The spending amounts for fiscal years 2011–12 to 2012–13 are actual results as presented in the Public Accounts of Canada. From 2011–12 to 2012–13, spending increased by 1.4% due to the costs associated with the PSLRB's involvement in arbitral awards and public interest commissions; its responsibilities associated with administering the collective bargaining process in the federal public service and in Parliament; and its investment in its information management (IM) and information technology (IT) infrastructure — the latter of which was previously a key priority for the PSLRB.

Forecast spending for 2013–14 is expected to be 4.7% lower than actual spending in 2012–13. This is primarily due to anticipated reduced expenses in IM and IT infrastructure investment.

For the 2014–15 to 2016–17 period, the total spending corresponds to the planned spending and consists of funding anticipated to be received through the Main Estimates, which has been fairly stable over the years.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the PSLRB's organizational appropriations, please see the 2014–15 Main Estimates publication.vi

The PSRLB also ensures that its decision-making process includes a consideration of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) goals and targets through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA). An SEA for policy, plan, or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.

Section II: Analysis of Program by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: The resolution of labour relations issues in the federal public service and in Parliament in an impartial manner

Program: Adjudication, mediation, and compensation analysis and research

Description: The PSLRB is mandated by the PSLRA to administer the collective bargaining and grievance adjudication systems in the federal public service. It is also mandated by the PESRA to perform the same role for the institutions of Parliament. Board members hold grievance adjudication and complaint hearings throughout Canada. The PSLRB provides conciliation and arbitration services to assist parties in the renewal and negotiation of collective agreements; mediation services to help parties work together to resolve grievances and complaints; and training in alternative dispute resolution. Its compensation, analysis, and research function consists of delivering information on comparative rates of pay, employee wages, terms and conditions of employment, and benefits in the public and private sectors. The PSLRB is required by statute to provide physical and administrative support services to the National Joint Council, but plays no direct role in its operations.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
9,896,701 9,896,701 9,896,701 9,896,701

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
64 64 64

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Cases are resolved through adjudication in accordance with the principles of law Among decisions referred for judicial review, percentage of challenges upheld in relation to the total number of decisions issued over a five-year period Less than 2% March 31, 2015
Cases and collective bargaining disputes are resolved through mediation interventions Percentage of mediations where grievances, collective bargaining disputes, or complaint issues are reduced or resolved 75% March 31, 2015
The use of PSLRB total compensation information within a bargaining or wage-setting context* Availability of compensation information 10% N/A

*This expected result is no longer applicable as a result of the Budget Implementation Act, which eliminated the PSLRB compensation analysis and research function. This expected result will be removed and be made retroactive to 2014–15, when the PSLRB amends its PAA for 2015–16.

Planning Highlights

The PSLRB will continue to leverage the Client Consultation Committee to seek better ways to effectively manage its growing caseload. It will also continue to use caseload analysis and to engage in bilateral discussions with stakeholders to identify new strategies, including a redesigned model for expedited adjudication and other specialized case management projects targeted to specific clients and their unique needs.

High-quality mediation and conflict resolution services will continue to be key elements of the PSLRB's statutory mandate during 2014–15.

Ongoing consultation with the parties (i.e., employers and bargaining agents) will focus on identifying areas for grouping cases and streamlining processing issues that might help increase the take-up for mediation.

Internal Services

Description:

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
3,848,711 3,848,711 3,848,711 3,848,711

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
29 29 29

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations presented in this subsection is intended to serve as a general overview of the PSLRB's operations. The forecasted financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the future-oriented statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of this report are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts will differ.

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the PSLRB's websitevii.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31 (dollars)

Financial information Estimated
Results 2013–14
Planned Results
2014–15
Change
Total expenses 15,741,820 17,309,483 1,567,663
Total revenues 106,854 145,000 38,146
Net cost of operations 15,634,966 17,164,483 1,529,517

The PSLRB projects $17.3 million in expenses and $0.1 million in revenues, based on the 2014–15 Main Estimates, the Supplementary Estimates, and amounts to be allocated at year-end from Treasury Board central votes. The majority of the funds, $12.5 million or 72%, will be spent on the adjudication, mediation, and compensation analysis and research services programs. The balance will be spent on internal services (i.e., $4.8 million or 28%).

List of Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on the PSLRB's websiteviii.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals, and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluationsix publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Public Service Labour Relations Board
P.O. Box 1525, Station
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
K1P 5V2

Tel: 613-990-1800
Toll free: 866-931-3454
Fax: 613-990-1849
Website: www.pslrb-crtfp.gc.ca
Email: mail.courrier@pslrb-crtfp.gc.ca

Endnotes

  1. Treasury Board Secretariat Estimates Publications and Appropriation Acts, http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ems-sgd/esp-pbc/esp-pbc-eng.asp.
  2. Selected Departmental Performance Reports for 2008-2009 Department of Industry, Department of Transport. Report of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, September 2010, http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Mode=1&Parl=40&Ses=3&Language=E&DocId=4653561&File=0.
  3. Strengthening Parliamentary Scrutiny of Estimates and Supply. Report of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates, June 2012, http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?DocId=5690996&Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=41&Ses=1.
  4. Whole-of-government framework, http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ppg-cpr/frame-cadre-eng.aspx.
  5. Government of Canada's Well-managed and Efficient Government Operations Outcome Area, http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ppg-cpr/frame-cadre-eng.aspx.
  6. 2014–15 Main Estimates, http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ems-sgd/esp-pbc/esp-pbc-eng.asp.
  7. A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes can be found on the PSLRB's website, http://www.pslrb-crtfp.gc.ca/reports/intro_e.asp.
  8. The supplementary information tables listed in the 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on the PSLRB's website, http://www.pslrb-crtfp.gc.ca/reports/intro_e.asp.
  9. Government of Canada Tax Expenditures, http://www.fin.gc.ca/purl/taxexp-eng.asp.